The NEW “ArtSlant Street” Site

Was asked to be feature as a spotlight artist on the new site “ArtSlant Street” a branch off “ArtSlant”. Check out all the freshness on www.artslantstreet.com Thanks Natalie @artslantstreet
ArtSlant_street

History Is A Weapon: Rethink Columbus Day

rethink
Arawak men and women, naked, tawny, and full of wonder, emerged from their villages onto the island’s beaches and swam out to get a closer look at the strange big boat. When Columbus and his sailors came ashore, carrying swords, speaking oddly, the Arawaks ran to greet them, brought them food, water, gifts. He later wrote of this in his log:

“…They … brought us parrots and balls of cotton and spears and many other things, which they exchanged for the glass beads and hawks’ bells. They willingly traded everything they owned… . They were well-built, with good bodies and handsome features…. They do not bear arms, and do not know them, for I showed them a sword, they took it by the edge and cut themselves out of ignorance. They have no iron. Their spears are made of cane… . They would make fine servants…. With fifty men we could subjugate them all and make them do whatever we want. …”

www.historyisaweapon.com

Proppertone!

Just got word from Yxta Maya Murray an American latina novelist and law professor. That The Harvard Journal on Racial and Ethnic Justice, a law review published by Harvard Law School will publish her 105 page article called “Inflammatory Statehood”. An article dealing with Arizona anti-immigrant policies. Which will include my artwork called “Proppertone”.
Much Thanks to Yxta Maya Murray.
newCoppertone1 “Americans have been taught that their nation is civilized and humane. But, too often, U.S. actions have been uncivilized and inhumane.” -Howard Zinn

Occupy Second Anniversary

#Occupy 2nd anniversary today. Nearly 8,000 protesters have been arrested since then. The gap between the rich & poor is still growing. Enjoy what you have, it may not last long. However “It’s always the ruling elite determine the configure of revolt.”
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“Study Your History…”

hiro

On this day 68 years ago by executive order of President Harry S. Truman the U.S. dropped the nuclear weapon “Little Boy” on the city of Hiroshima on Monday, August 6, 1945, followed by the detonation of “Fat Man” over Nagasaki on August 9. These two events are the only active deployments of nuclear weapons in war.

Within the first two to four months of the bombings, the acute effects killed 90,000–166,000 people in Hiroshima and 60,000–80,000 in Nagasaki, with roughly half of the deaths in each city occurring on the first day. The Hiroshima prefectural health department estimates that, of the people who died on the day of the explosion, 60% died from flash or flame burns, 30% from falling debris and 10% from other causes.

Depiction and Public response:
During the war “annihilationist and exterminationalist rhetoric” was tolerated at all levels of U.S. society; according to the UK embassy in Washington the Americans regarded the Japanese as “a nameless mass of vermin”. Caricatures depicting Japanese as less than human, e.g. monkeys, were common. A 1944 opinion poll that asked what should be done with Japan found that 13% of the U.S. public were in favor of the extermination of all Japanese, men women and children. News of the atomic bombing were greeted enthusiastically in the U.S.; a poll in Fortune magazine in late 1945 showed a significant minority of Americans wishing that more atomic bombs could have been dropped on Japan. The initial positive response was supported by the imagery presented to the public, (mainly the powerful mushroom cloud) and the absence of evidence of the human effects—photographs showing corpses and maimed survivors—were suppressed, and reports were censored. As an example, a member of the U.S. Strategic Bombing Survey, Lieutenant Daniel McGovern, used a film crew to document the results. The film crew’s work resulted in a three-hour documentary entitled The Effects of the Atomic Bombs Against Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The documentary included images from hospitals showing the human effects of the bomb; it showed burned out buildings and cars, and rows of skulls and bones on the ground. When sent to the U.S., it was mentioned widely in the U.S. press, then quietly suppressed and never shown. It was classified “top secret” for the next 22 years.

Imagery of the atomic bombings was suppressed in Japan during the occupation[89] although some Japanese magazines had managed to publish images before the Allied occupation troops took control. The Allied occupation forces enforced censorship on anything “that might, directly or by inference, disturb public tranquility”, and pictures of the effects of the people on the ground were deemed inflammatory. A likely reason for the banning was that the images depicting burn victims and funeral pyres evoked similarities to the widely circulated images taken in liberated Nazi concentration camps.
Hiroshima/the atomic bomb: Part I
Hiroshima/the atomic bomb: Part II

“… Study your history — Whoever don’t? I pity-the-fool like Mr. T Knowledge this degree, it ain’t no mystery…”

History Is A Weapon: Rethink Columbus Day


Arawak men and women, naked, tawny, and full of wonder, emerged from their villages onto the island’s beaches and swam out to get a closer look at the strange big boat. When Columbus and his sailors came ashore, carrying swords, speaking oddly, the Arawaks ran to greet them, brought them food, water, gifts. He later wrote of this in his log:

“…They … brought us parrots and balls of cotton and spears and many other things, which they exchanged for the glass beads and hawks’ bells. They willingly traded everything they owned… . They were well-built, with good bodies and handsome features…. They do not bear arms, and do not know them, for I showed them a sword, they took it by the edge and cut themselves out of ignorance. They have no iron. Their spears are made of cane… . They would make fine servants…. With fifty men we could subjugate them all and make them do whatever we want. …”

www.historyisaweapon.com/

EnikOne Is Chillin…

“…Check it out
MC am I people call me ENIK
When I’m bustin up a party I feel no guilt
Gizmo’s cuttin, up for the
Suckers that’s, down with meeee!!
The One of us, that’s how I feel
To be down you must appeal
To the Two, we’re rated R
We’re gifted, and we’re going far
Down the road, to the bank
While I’m here I’d like to thank
Mom and dad, they knew the time
Gizmo’s scratching Milk Dee’s rhyming
Milk is chillin, Enik is chillin
What more can I say? Top billin
That’s what we get, got it good
Since you understood, would you
Stop scheming, and looking hard
I got a great big bodyguard

So step up if you wanna get hurt…”